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Showing posts from December, 2005

We're hiring!

We're hiring!

Benetech is in growth mode, and we're hiring for three positions right now. I'm seeking a new CTO to help grow Benetech's project portfolio and our engineering team, and to help me handle the incredible range of opportunities Benetech has for changing the world. Bookshare.org needs a dynamic person to manage and drive the expansion of our collection, managing both automated and volunteer processes to bring more books to more people with disabilities around the world. And, everyone at Benetech needs us to find the right Office Administrator, the jack of all trades who can keep our entire team and our stakeholders connected and on track.

Working for Benetech is a rare opportunity for people in the Silicon Valley to apply their technical, managerial, professional and administrative talents to directly advancing the causes of literacy, human rights, the environment and the prevention of suffering (i.e., our landmine detector project). We need to see candi…

Social Enterprise Alliance

I am proud to be affiliated with the Social Enterprise Alliance, a group that works to advance the cause of people who run enterprises with a social mission. Early bird registration has just started for the Seventh Gathering, the annual meeting of the Alliance. It will be held in Atlanta in early March, and I will definitely be there!

Jim does Tunis

Jim's adventures in Tunis

I had to write these experiences down. They are not Benetech-relevant, but I circulated them inside Benetech and was encouraged to post them in the Beneblog. Advance notice: my longest post ever.

Written on November 20, 2005.

I felt the need to jot down a few notes about my visit to the old part of the city of Tunis. It's a series of stories, all crammed into less than 24 hours. After the WSIS conference, where I had been housed in Hammamet, 50 miles away and a 1.5 to 2 hour bus ride away from everything, I moved for one night to Tunis to visit the medina. Note on prices: I use $ for prices, but the numbers are actually Tunisian dinars, which are 1.3 to the U.S. dollar. So, if you see a number like $13 below, it's actually less in U.S. dollars, more like US$10. The links link to a few of the pictures I took and posted on Flickr.

My new friends.

Walking into the medina, the old part of Tunis, I suddenly acquired very friendly people from Tunisia s…